Polar Bears go the distance – once again!

Clevedon Marine Lake is run by Marlens’ charity and its team of volunteers, who work hard year-round to maintain and develop this amazing space.

It costs £20,000 per annum to keep Clevedon Marine Lake open to the public.

£5,000 alone is required each year to dredge hundreds of tonnes of mud out of the lake, as part of a 10-year programme to remove 5,000 tonnes of mud from the lakebed.  The mud is two feet deep in some areas having accumulated over the years, brought in by the overtopping tides from the Severn Estuary.

The initial application to remove mud from the lake cost £10,000.  Marlens has secured permission from Marine Management Organisation to dredge the lake twice a year, in the autumn and spring, over the next decade – which began last year.

The lake was dredged in October 2019 where 400 tonnes of silt and mud was removed, and again in March 2020 with an estimated 750 tonnes of silt and mud removed from the bed of the lake.  Until then, the last time any mud was removed from Clevedon Marine Lake was in the summer of 2015 as part of a major refurbishment.

It is important to ‘keep on top of the mud’ from now on – and with each dredge costing around £2,500, the entire project requires in excess of £60,000.

There are many ways in which you can Help us Help the Lake.  Simply click on the link and explore how you can make a difference.  And if you fancy something more immersive…

A great fundraising scheme which has been running for 3 years at Clevedon Marine Lake is the Polar Bear Challenge, thanks to organisers Hilary Jenkins-Spangler (pictured) and Gavin Price, members of Clevedon Lake & Sea Swimmers.

Every year during the winter months, November to March, lots of brave swimmers challenge themselves to swim regularly in the cold waters of Clevedon Marine Lake, incentivised by the Polar Bear Challenge.  The challenge requires participants to swim a minimum of 100m twice a month.  One way to rack up the required distance is a 100m circuit around the lake’s much-loved pontoon.

This season 2019-20, the Polar Bear Challenge raised close to £800 to support Marlens.  Well done and thank you Clevedon Polar Bears for enjoying the cold water and making a difference!

 

Fishhooks are a hazard to lake users

Fishing tackle especially hooks should not to be left in or around the lake, likewise bait.

A fishhook is a curved, sharp instrument designed to keep the catch on the hook with a barb near the tip. It will cause injury to a person if stepped on or handled inappropriately.

If you’re visiting to fish, be it in the lake or over the wall in the estuary, please be mindful of other lake users.

Please read our guide to Happy Crabbing.

Stay out of the lake when the tide is over the seawall

A male swimmer was rescued by RNLI helicopter and HM Coastguard this morning after swimming over the seawall into the estuary during the overtopping tide; he was subsequently dragged by the rip and pulled downstream in the ebb, 40 minutes after high tide, which was at 7.43am.  Fortunately, he is reported to be fine.

It is dangerous to access the lake to swim during overtopping tides.  A strong rip is created on the estuary side of the seawall, which can quickly sweep swimmers away from the lake and into the tidal flow.

Clevedon Marine Lake in nestled in the Severn Estuary, which has the third largest tidal range in the world.  This means that the sea at Clevedon has an extremely strong tidal pull.

The sea overtops the outer wall of Clevedon Marine Lake at the top of high spring tides of 12.6m or more – refreshing the water in the lake.  The lake becomes part of the Severn Estuary and the seawall is no longer visible.  In addition, the lower promenade can completely disappear underwater during overtops.

Clevedon Marine Lake overtops approximately every two weeks during spring tides.  Spring tides have the greatest tidal range and occur during the full moon and the new moon phases, twice each lunar month all year long without regard to the season.  In rougher conditions, fresh seawater will spill into the lake before a high tide of 12.6m is reached.

  • Always check tide times and heights when planning your lake visit.  A series of overtops at high tide can last a full week.
  • Know which way the tide is flowing (in or out) when you arrive at the lake.
  • Do NOT enter the lake around high tide when 12.6m or higher tides are expected.

As we approach the peak months for usage of Clevedon Marine Lake – coinciding with the expected easing of lockdown, Marlens, the charity behind the lake, urges people to heed all the advice on site and on the lake website.

During lockdown, Clevedon Marine Lake has remained open for individual exercise, with visitors reminded to maintain a distance of at least 2m from each other.  Users have been requested to access the lake grounds responsibly, in line with Government guidelines and to avoid unnecessary travel.